Not all aeration is the same

iowa lawn pro utilizes core aeration

 

with optional

overseeding

Core Aeration

Breathe new life into your lawn’s roots!
 

Why does my lawn need core aeration?

Over time your soil becomes compacted.  This is especially true if you have a newer house with clay soils.  This compaction impedes the movement of air, water and nutrients to the grass roots.
 

When is the best time of year to core aerate?

Most times we aerate in fall or spring.  However if you're wanting to overseed in conjunction with aeration, then fall is best.

How do I know when I should aerate my lawn?

When compacted, soil contributes to the accumulation of thatch because restricted oxygen levels impair the activity of earthworms and other thatch-decomposing organisms.
Thatch accumulates faster on compacted soils and heavy clay soils than on well aerified soils.

 

When thatch depth exceeds 1/2” it becomes a problem, reducing water movement and encouraging shallow, weak root systems. Thick thatch can also become a home for insects and disease. 

How core aeration strengthens your lawn
 

How does core aeration work?

Core aeration involves the removal of small soil plugs or cores out of the lawn. Known as a core aerator, the machine extracts 1/2 to 3/4 inch diameter cores of soil and deposits them on your lawn.

 

Aeration holes are typically 1-3 inches deep and 2-6 inches apart.
 

Core aeration is a recommended as part of your annual lawn care health plan.  This will control any thatch buildup, especially on compacted, heavily used turf.
 

How will my lawn benefit from core aeration?

The aeration process will loosen the compacted soil and increase the transfer of water and other nutrients.
 

Root growth will be stimulated by increasing oxygen levels in the soil. 

 

You will have increased activity of healthy organisms which decompose thatch.
 

Your lawn’s drought tolerance and overall health will be improved.
 

Your turf will produce new shoots and roots “filling up” the holes left behind from core aeration, increasing the lawns density.

 

 

It’s never too late, or too soon, to start helping your lawn breath and take in the nutrients it needs!

overseedinG YOUR LAWN

BROADCAST SEEDING

Broadcast seeding is the scattering of seed over the soil surface through the use of a broadcast spreader, drop spreader, or by hand.

 

This is a cost-effective way of thickening up thinner lawns where thatch builds up is not a problem and adequate seed to soil contact can be easily achieved.

 

We use only premium cool season seed varieties well adapted to your lawns growing conditions. Application rate is determined by turf density and varies from general (light rate) overseeding to new lawn (heavy rate) overseeding.

 

To ensure adequate loosening of the soil surface for quick establishment of seedlings, broadcast seeding is almost always combined with core aeration or tilling.

 

Broadcast seeding is only available in the fall unless special circumstances necessitate seeding.


SLIT SEEDING

Power seeding is a process that combines the application of seed with a mechanical process that cuts slits or grooves through the thatch layer (less than a ½ inch) to expose the soil for improved seed-to-soil contact.

 

We use only premium cool season seed varieties well adapted to your lawns growing conditions.

 

Application rate is determined by turf density and varies from general (light rate) overseeding to new lawn (heavy rate) overseeding.

 

As with broadcast seeding, combining core aeration with power seeding will greatly improve turfgrass establishment after germination occurs.

 

Power seeding is only available in the fall unless special circumstances necessitate seeding.


Call or Text Us at 515.999.6929

service@iowalawnpro.com

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